The Book of Sallustius the Philosopher I–IV

Translated from the original Greek by Ɔ. Martiana. This translation is in the public domain. I 1. (αʹ) Those who want to learn about the gods must have been raised well from their childhood, and not be educated in ignorant doctrines; they must be good and rational in their nature, so that they may attend … The Book of Sallustius the Philosopher I–IV weiterlesen

„On Herbs“: Some Excerpts

These chapters are taken from my eBook, On Herbs: An Anonymous Greek Poem, the first English translation of the so-called Carmen de herbis: (2) Rhamnus (‘boxthorn, buckthorn’)As a powerful panacea, have rhamnus in your house,A white-leaved thorny plant growing in hedges.It is a plant of the night; and it is helpful to mortalsTo gather this … „On Herbs“: Some Excerpts weiterlesen

The Human Body in Latin (according to curse tablets)

There are various sources for Latin terminology of the body: Greco-Latin word lists, medical texts, Pliny's Natural History... but also a number of curse tablets, which have their unique priorities. The one I will give here is also highly interesting orthographically. Translated into English (with normalized Latin words in parentheses), it runs as follows: (1) … The Human Body in Latin (according to curse tablets) weiterlesen

„The Bubbling Waters“: A Latin Curse Tablet

Sometime in the 2nd century CE, a lead tablet seeking the death of a certain Caucadio was deposited in a spring in the the Etrurian city of Arretium (now Arezzo in Tuscany). The spring was evidently not associated with a specific deity, but the author of the defixio ('binding' or curse tablet) used a way … „The Bubbling Waters“: A Latin Curse Tablet weiterlesen